techradar reviews phones mobile phones iphone 6s

iPhone 6S review dashcrab

Apple’s tagline for the iPhone 6S is ‘the only thing that’s changed is everything’, highlighting that the brand knows this is a phone that looks an awful lot like last year’s model.

It makes sense that Apple would try its hardest to show that, despite the handset looking identical to last year’s model, there have been loads of changes under the hood that make this an attractive phone in its own right.

The chassis is stronger, the camera sharper – with a new Harry Potter-esque way of capturing your snaps – and there’s even a completely new way of interacting with the screen. On paper, it’s an impressive upgrade.

techradar reviews phones mobile phones iphone

But when it looks identical to the iPhone 6, people will be desperate to know if the iPhone 6S is enough of an upgrade to justify the price. While the upgrades seem great, is it worth going all the way up to the iPhone 6S, or would the 6 do?

In terms of raw price, we’re in a weird situation now. Samsung and the rest of the Android crew have been slowly ratcheting up the price of their high-end phones to the point where they’re actually eclipsing the iPhone 6S at launch.

However, Apple’s once again been the victim of its off-kilter launch cycle, meaning it’s putting its phone into a market where the Galaxy S6 is now significantly cheaper – and so the iPhone 6S has a higher price to live up to. That said, this new phone is just that: a new phone. That means some potential buyers will be enamoured with the notion of getting the latest tech on the market rather than a six-month-old handset.

In the UK, that means between £50 and £100 upfront to get the phone for £36-£38 per month (if you want a decent slug of data and minutes) with the phone starting at £539 for the 16GB model, £619 for the 64GB model and £699 for 128GB.

It’s starting at $649 if you’re looking to pick it up off contract in the US, with the new $32.45 monthly cost if you’re thinking of getting locked into Apple’s yearly upgrade plan.

 

iPhone 6S review

In reality though, the question of who this phone is aimed at isn’t that hard to answer: for most people stuck on the iPhone 5S it’s clearly the upgrade they’re considering, and beyond that there’s the disgruntled Android owner who’s tired of looking at the slicker app experience Apple offers and seeing their own handset looking sketchy in comparison.

(Of course, there are a few people that tried Windows Phones as experiments, but they’d probably be happy with just about any other phone if they’re still using a Nokia Lumia 930).

 

iPhone 6S review

The difference between the iPhone 6 (left) and iPhone 6S (right) is nearly impossible to see
The issue Apple is trying to solve with the iPhone 6S (and the 6S Plus) is how it can convince users, especially in a market saturated with really rather brilliant smartphones, that the ‘S’ variant of the impressive iPhone 6 is a worthy phone to upgrade to in its own right.

When something is so visually similar, the onus is on the brand to show that the upgrades are really worth the extra cash.

Even if Apple keeps users within its own ecosystem there’s every chance they’ll look at the iPhone 6, which is now much cheaper – so it needs to make sure things like a stronger chassis, animated photos and a new pressable screen are worth the extra outlay when both phones will still work perfectly well in a couple of years’ time.

Design

You’ve probably already heard, but the iPhone 6S is almost identical to last year’s 6 in every way when it comes to the chassis. There are some very subtle differences, such as a slightly thicker frame and a little more heft, but it’s so slight that I kept getting the two mixed up when doing side by side comparisons.

All cases fit both phones just fine too so, apart from a small S logo on the back of the phone, nobody is going to notice you’ve got the latest iPhone.

But there will be lots of you upgrading from the iPhone 5S, and in that case you’ll need to be ready for a really big design change. The metallic chassis feels really nice in the hand, with a ceramic-like feeling on the outside (although if it’s anything like the 6 then this can scuff over time if you keep it in a pocket with keys, so you’ll need to think about the kind of case you’ll want to keep it safe).

techradar reviews phones  iphone 6s.mobile phonesPNG

iPhone 6S review

One of the things that Apple is touting is the fact the iPhone 6S is made of 7000 series aluminum, which is the strongest thing it’s ever used in iPhone construction. The obvious connection people will make is with ‘Bendgate’ last year, when some users claimed their new phone had developed a slight curve in their pocket without much pressure.

The common belief was that these phones began to twist when placed in a rear pocket and sat upon. While it was proven that other metal phones actually were worse when it came to bending Apple didn’t come out of the controversy well.

So it’s no surprise that, while the company won’t admit the real reason, the new iPhone is strong and never going to bend with such pressure. However, I feel like that we shouldn’t feel happy our phones no longer bend – this seems like one of the minimum expectations I’d have of a smartphone, not a compelling reason to buy it.

The front of the phone is now covered in a new level of strength, with a glass that’s far less prone to shattering when dropped on the floor – now that’s something I can get behind. We’ve not drop tested it – we’ll leave that to some other, braver reviewer – if the screen is stronger the responsiveness hasn’t dropped.

 

iPhone 6S review

In the hand, the iPhone 6S still feels like a dream. Even with the extra 14g over the iPhone it feels lightweight, easy to manipulate and really warrants the price. Samsung’s new Galaxy S6 Edge invokes the same kind of feeling, and with it you don’t mind spending the extra money over a more budget phone.

In terms of design, if you’ve seen the iPhone 6 then you’ve seen the 6S. The volume buttons, the power key, the silencer switch and the speaker are all in the same place as last year, with the grille at the bottom very easy to cover when you’re watching videos or playing games in landscape.

If you’re using the 5S, this is leagues ahead. The construction is good, the materials solid and there’s no wiggle in the buttons at all. While you probably never bent your 5S, the idea that the iPhone 6S is stronger will probably please you, however unnecessary the claim is.

Apple’s not done anything great with the design of the iPhone 6S, but the iPhone 6 was such a well-created phone that using the same chassis isn’t going to harm its chances of success.

However, combined with the higher price and the continued presence of last year’s model, I wish we were at least seeing some retooling of the phone to make it seem more attractive.

Screen

The screen on the iPhone 6S seems to be identical to last year’s: we’re talking a 4.7-inch affair with 750p resolution, which keeps it firmly in the ‘Retina’ range that the firm debuted all the way back with the iPhone 4.

It’s hard to rate the display, as while it fails on resolution (quite spectacularly actually – phones a seventh the cost of the iPhone 6S offer 1080p screens, Samsung’s cheaper phone has four times the resolution of the 6S and Sony has, inexplicably, just launched a 4K phone) it doesn’t drop too badly on performance.

 

iPhone 6S review

The iPhone 6S display is clear, bright, laminated to the glass and insanely colorful. The first time I saw it on the iPhone 6 I thought it was a fake picture stuck on top of a dummy unit, such was the clarity on offer.

So to use the same thing on the iPhone 6S makes sense – after all, the lower pixel count means it can be thinner and the battery can last longer, thanks to having fewer pixels to drive.

But there are some things missing: for instance, the contrast ratio (the difference between the brightest and darkest parts of the screen) is still poor, with the black areas looking a little grey. Samsung’s Galaxy range predominantly uses OLED technology, which offers ‘true’ blacks and high brightness and packs a much better visual punch, and would have suited the iPhone down to the ground.

The sharpness in side by side tests is clearly lower too – the 326 pixels per inch is very low even compared the 401ppi of the iPhone 6S Plus – and most other models are over 500ppi to bring really, really clear displays.

Given OLED technology is used in the Apple Watch – and admittedly it looks brilliant – it’s a shame the same thing couldn’t have been done with the iPhone 6S.

It’s important not to get too hung up on screen resolution in a phone – after all, if it’s not serving a purpose (hey, Sony?) then it’s just wasting battery. But the industry has moved on, and the higher pixel densities on offer are starting to really bring something to the table, with apps and general use looking pin sharp.

Here’s hoping the iPhone 7 makes a massive jump forward to join the rest of the pack.

source: http://www.techradar.com/reviews/phones/mobile-phones/iphone-6s-1303758/review

 

Apple iPhone 6 Plus review A super-sized phone delivers with a stellar display and long battery life dashcrab

Apple iPhone 6 Plus review: A super-sized phone delivers with a stellar display and long battery life dashcrab

Apple iPhone 6 Plus review  battery life  A super-sized phone delivers with a stellar display and longdashcrab

The iPhone 6 is an exceptional phone in nearly every way but for its good-but-not-great battery life. The iPhone 6 Plus is also impressive; larger and thinner than other iPhone models, and with the capacity for far more endurance on a single charge than most comparably-sized and smaller competitors.

As great a phone as it is, the iPhone 6 Plus isn’t for everybody. Its defining characteristic is its size, which occupies a nice middle ground between the 4-inch iPhone 5S and the 7.9-inch iPad Mini . While the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 is considerably more portable, the 6 Plus will hit the sweet spot for those who want a bigger display on their smartphone (and prefer iOS to Android).

And remember: a 5.5-inch screen may feel gigantic at first, but it may end up feeling just right in no time.

Editors’ note: This review was updated June 15, 2015 with new comparisons to more current phones, and other reflections on the 2015 smartphone and iPhone marketplace.

 

Review update: Summer 2015

If Apple sticks to the same mid-September release calendar it’s followed for the past several years, we are just a few short months away from the next version of the iPhone. And if Cupertino follows the same upgrade plan — big redesigns for even numbered years, internal specs updates for odd ones — we can likely expect something a bit less radical than the big-screen makeover the iPhone got in 2014. (You can read our predictions of what to expect from the next iPhone here ).

At its Worldwide Developers Conference in June, Apple introduced the next edition of its mobile operating system, iOS 9 . Apple promised a stronger, more “proactive” version of Siri, the personal assistant; an upgraded maps app and a new news app; as well as, importantly for iPhone users, improved battery life (plus a new low-power mode for even longer performance). For now, iOS 9 is available only to developers; the rest of us can sign up for the public beta in July.

Those looking to purchase an iPhone this summer are advised that Apple also still sells the iPhone 5S and the iPhone 5C — both of which, in what are likely to be their waning days on store shelves, constitute an excellent value. If you’re looking to buy a larger phone or phablet, the iPhone 6 Plus , with its elegant design, fantastic camera, and user-friendly OS, certainly remains among our favorites. That noted, you might also consider the Galaxy Note 4 , an Android-based device with an appealing design, powerful performance, a great suite of native productivity tools, expandable storage and swappable battery, and a useful S Pen stylus.

 

Availability

The iPhone 6 Plus’s larger profile comes with a higher price tag. The device is available in the US with a two-year contract from AT&T, Sprint and Verizon; the 16GB version will set you back $299, with 64GB at $349 and the top-end 128GB costing $449. Contract-free on T-Mobile, it costs $749, $849 or $949 respectively. You can find a more detailed rundown of US carrier plans here.

 

source:http://www.cnet.com/products/apple-iphone-6-plus/

The iPhone 6s, iPad Pro AND iOS 9 How It All Fits Together knowyourmobile dashcrab

The iPhone 6s, iPad Pro AND iOS 9: How It All Fits Together dashecrab

iOS 8 is in the bag. Ditto for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. Now we look forward to 2015’s iOS 9 and iPhone 6s

knowyourmobile The iPhone 6s, iPad Pro AND iOS 9 How It All Fits Together dashcrab

While anyone purchasing a new iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus or one of the new iPads will get iOS 9 straight out the box, for everyone else the new software build is rolling out to existing devices as of September 16 2015. If you own a compatible Apple device you should be getting a push notification very shortly to let you know the update is ready to be downloaded. As is often the case with such things, the rollout will likely hit in stages region-by-region, so if it doesn’t come up straight away don’t fret, just keep an eye on things for the next day or so.

At WWDC 2015 Apple unveiled a ton of new software features and enhancements for its Macs, Apple Watch, and the brand new Apple Music service. Of course for many the biggest star of the show was iOS 9. As it has been every year since the original iPhone’s debut, a large part of this year’s keynote involved showing off the major new features of iOS 9. However, this year instead of deciding to pack the next version of iOS with new feature after new feature, the company took the step of focusing on making iOS 9 more stable. That’s quite understandable given all the drama that occured from iOS 8’s instability issues.

Apple has now released iOS 9.2, the second biggish update to its 2015 platform overhaul, iOS 9. At launch Apple said iOS 9 was all about stability, focussing on what features Apple has previously established, adding in a few more for the iPhone 6s, and really drilling down on performance, efficiency and power management. The result was decent, but as always there was room for improvement and this is where iOS 9.1 and iOS 9.2 came in.

In order to experience the full potential of iOS 9, you kind of have to pick up one of Apple’s new products: the iPhone 6S, iPhone 6s Plus or the iPad Pro. All three feature a raft of new features such as 3D Touch, split screen multitasking and a bunch more besides. For the rest of us, the update is more about refining what’s already in place and tightening up loose ends.

Don’t worry, though. It’s not quite as dull as it sounds, as there are plenty of new features to get excited about. Apple has revamped Siri yet again, made some pretty significant improvements to Apple Maps, added in split screen multitasking to the iPad and released a new keyboard, again, only for the iPad.

knowyourmobile The iPhone 6s, iPad Pro AND iOS 9 How It All Fits dashcrab

“iOS 9 is packed with more intelligence throughout, and delivers big updates to the apps customers use most — Maps supports public transit, a redesigned Notes app provides great new ways to capture ideas, and a beautiful News app delivers content that’s personalised to your interests,” said Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of Software Engineering. “With our new iPad features, users can take advantage of the power of iPad, working in two apps at the same time with Split View, Slide Over or Picture-in-Picture.”

Apple has announced it has sold more than 13 million new iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus models, a new record, just three days after launch. iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus will be available in more than 40 additional countries beginning October 9 including Italy, Mexico, Russia, Spain and Taiwan. The new iPhones will be available in over 130 countries by the end of the year.

“Sales for iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus have been phenomenal, blowing past any previous first weekend sales results in Apple’s history,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “Customers’ feedback is incredible and they are loving 3D Touch and Live Photos, and we can’t wait to bring iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus to customers in even more countries on October 9.”

Apple has announced that iOS 9 will be released to the general public on Wednesday, September 16 as a free update for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch users. It will require the iPhone 4s and later, iPod touch 5th generation and later, iPad 2 and later and iPad mini and later.

knowyourmobile The iPhone 6s, iPad Pro AND iOS 9 How It All Fits Together iOS 9 on the iPhone 6s dashcrab

iOS 9 on the iPhone 6s

The killer new feature of the iPhone 6s is its 3DTouch display. This is a new type of touchscreen that senses depth and pressure in addition to touch. That means your iPhone 6s will be able to tell how hard you’re pressing it and respond with new actions based on the strength of your touch. Apple calls these actions “Peek” and “Pop” and they work both in-app and on the home screen.
For example, in Messages you can force touch on a message to “peek” into it without needing to navigate into the thread. You can then press a bit harder if you like what you see and “pop” into that thread automatically. Peek and pop also works for calendar events, web URLs, and more.
The 3DTouch display also allows you to jump to sections of a specific app right from the home screen. For example, you can force touch the Phone app to get a popup menu that shows you favorite contacts. Simply touch their name and the call will be made without needing to open the Phone app at all.

The 3DTouch display changes the way we interact with iOS 9, which is why it will feel like a totally different operating system on the iPhone 6s. iPhone models below the 6s won’t have access to all the cool new Peek and Pop features.

iPhone 6s aside, there are a ton of new features for all iPhones, but for now these listed below are, in our opinion, the most significant:

INSANE Improvements To Battery Life
One of the biggest things we’re excited about, however, are the developments Apple is making in its war against poor battery life. The iPhone 6 Plus has an exceptional battery life, so good in fact it is difficult to switch to another phone for very long –– you just miss it too much. However, Apple isn’t done yet –– and the latest development will bring even BIGGER improvements to battery life across the board. It’s called “Low Power” mode and it is likely to be a very big deal.

“Across the entire operating system, apps and key technologies have been made more efficient to trim battery usage wherever possible — so you get more battery life for the things you do every day. Thanks to ambient light and proximity sensors, your iPhone knows if it’s facedown on the table and prevents the screen from turning on, even when you receive a notification. And the new Low Power mode lets you extend your battery life even further,” noted Apple at WWDC 2015.

 

source:www.nowyourmobile.com

dashcrab iPhone 6s and 6s Plus review More than just a refresh

iPhone 6s and 6s Plus review: More than just a refresh

iPhone 6s and 6s Plus review: More than just a refresh

iPhone 6s and 6s Plus review More than just a refresh dashcrab

Some people look a little unkindly on the so-called “S” years — those years when Apple updates the iPhone, but doesn’t change how it looks, and then sells that while secretly working on something flashier that will debut 12 months later. I don’t think that’s exactly fair. Those “S” years are when Apple adds some of its most useful features. Siri? Touch ID? Both valuable additions to the iPhone platform that have since grown in importance. This year we get 3D Touch, a potentially awesome way to interact with iPhones. The thing is, a device’s worth isn’t just tied up in one feature: It’s about how all those moving parts work together. That’s why the new 6s and 6s Plus (starting at $649 and $749, respectively, for 16GB models) are such great phones. The combination of much-improved hardware and some polished software makes this year’s release far more than just a modest refresh.

source:http://www.engadget.com/2015/10/01/iphone-6s-and-6s-plus-review/

The best iPhone 6S deals for Black Friday.

The best iPhone 6S deals for Black Friday: Save £200 with code BLACKFRI200 dashcrab

The amazing deal to save £125 on the iPhone 6S 64GB is still going, but Mobiles.co.uk, Vodafone and now the UK’s favourite network EE have just launched two new Black Friday iPhone 6S deals on the best-of-the-best iPhone 6S 128GB and they’re truly awesome.

If you want the best version of the best phone, these could be the deals for you. Offering 128GB capacities for about the same price as the 16GB model – we’ve done the maths and these are not only the best deals out there, they’re the best deals by a comfortable margin.

They will run until Monday (or until stock runs out) so there’s a limited window to grab these ones – you’ll need to be quick off the mark. Note that all of these deals have different voucher codes!

Firstly, here’s that incredible iPhone 6S 64GB with £125 off and 6GB data…

TOP DEAL: Black Friday iPhone 6S deal: save £125

This is the very best iPhone deal out there for Black Friday. Save £125 and get the superior 64GB version of the iPhone 6S with 6GB data on Vodafone – seriously this is an incredible deal and it’s the one we’d go for!

iPhone 6S 64GB | 4G | £225 £100 upfront | Unlimited calls and texts | 6GB data | £31pm

Using the voucher code BLACKFRI6S you can save £125 on the superior 64GB version of the iPhone 6S – that leaves you paying £100 for the phone instead of the normal price of £225. This deal bags you 6GB data – which is 4GB more than the two deals above.

Get this deal in Rose Gold
Get this deal in Gold
Voucher code: BLACKFRI6S

Here are the alternative iPhone 6S 128GB deals…

2. Black Friday iPhone 6S deal: save £200

iPhone 6S 128GB | £300 £100 upfront | Vodafone 4G | 1000 min | Unlimited txt | 2GB data | 2GB | £34pm
Using the code BLACKFRI200 you can save £200 on the upfront cost of the iPhone 6S 128GB and pay £100 upfront instead of £300. Then you’re talking £34 per month for 1000 minutes, unlimited texts and 2GB data from Vodafone.

Get this deal in Space Grey
Get this deal in Rose Gold
Get this deal in Silver
Get this deal in Gold
Voucher code: BLACKFRI200

3. Black Friday iPhone 6S deal: save £70

iPhone 6S 128GB | £170 £100 upfront | Unlimited mins + txts | 2GB | EE 4G | £34.99pm
Using the code BLACKFRI70 you can again pay just £100 (saving £70) for the iPhone 6S 128GB, this time on EE. For £34.99 per month, you’ll get unlimited calls and texts and data. This deal should please anyone who wants to be on EE which, let’s face it, is the UK’s most popular (and best?) network.

Get this deal in Space Grey
Get this deal in Rose Gold
Get this deal in Silver
Get this deal in Gold
Voucher code: BLACKFRI70
Which of these deals you go for is up to you. For the privilege of going with EE, you’re just paying an extra 99p per month which is a small ask if you ask us – especially when you look at these prices compared to what else is out there.

souce:http://techradar.com

iphone6s plus review techradar

iphone6s plus reviews in techradar

A 5.5-inch iPhone. It’s something which will send a shudder down the spines of a collective of die-hard Apple fans, a handset some thought we’d never see from the Cupertino-based outfit.

Yet here I am, staring down the barrel of the biggest iPhone in history – the iPhone 6 Plus.

It arrived alongside the iPhone 6 – Apple’s new flagship smartphone – which measures 4.7 inches, making it more welcoming to a wider array of palms than the supersized iPhone 6 Plus.

Many of you, especially those of an Android persuasion, may be wondering what all the fuss is about. After all the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 turned up with a 5.5-inch display over two years ago.

Compare: all the best iPhone 6 Plus deals
Take a moment to glance at the history of the iPhone though, and you’ll see why the iPhone 6 Plus is such a big deal.

Previously Apple has only dealt in two screen sizes – a 3.5-inch display graced the first five generations of iPhone, and just three have had the pleasure of a larger 4-inch display.
5.5 inches then is a huge leap forward for Apple, moving its iPhone range into the uncharted waters of the phablet market currently dominated by Samsung and other Android devices.

Apple is looking to reach a previously untapped audience of smartphone users – those who demand a large screen, with ‘productivity’ the main buzzword being thrown around.

A key market for the iPhone 6 Plus is Asia, where general consensus seems to be bigger = better when it comes to smartphone screens.

In terms of specs and design there isn’t a huge amount of difference between the iPhone 6 Plus and the iPhone 6 – apart from the obvious size.

 

iphone6s plus reveiws

 

iPhone 6 Plus review

The iPhone 6 Plus does boast a couple of unique features however. It’s the first iPhone to pack a full HD display, plus its bigger body means it houses a larger battery than its 4.7-inch brother.

Both sport A8 64-bit processors, 1GB of RAM, M8 motion coprocessors and 8MP rear facing cameras – but the snapper on the iPhone 6 Plus benefits from OIS (optical image stabilisation) while the iPhone 6 makes do with EIS (electronic image stabilisation).

As with all Apple products the iPhone 6 Plus doesn’t come cheap, and you may want to brace yourself because it’s one of the most expensive handsets around.
SIM-free the 16GB iPhone 6 Plus carries a lofty price tag of $749, £619, AU$999 – and that’s just the start.

Apple has ditched the 32GB variant for both the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, with the next storage level coming in at 64GB, and for the 5.5-inch iPhone that equals $849, £699, AU$1129.

The good news for storage fans is that Apple has finally introduced a 128GB model – which may quieten those whining about the lack of a microSD slot – but it will cost you a small fortune. $949, £789, AU$1249 to be exact.

There may be a price cut on the way – but that’s just rumour at the moment. Given there’s a very likely iPhone 6S Plus incoming in a couple of months though, that price drop to clear some stock seems like something worth waiting for right now…
That makes the iPhone 6 Plus comfortably more expensive than rival phablets including the LG G4, OnePlus One, Nokia Lumia 1520 and Samsung Galaxy Note

 

from:techradar.com

iphone6s plus carmount dashcrab

Apple iPhone 6 Plus review

Apple iPhone 6 Plus review

its iPhone product line, simultaneously introducing the next generation of its flagship model — the iPhone 6 — and debuting its super-sized sibling, the iPhone 6 Plus. The iPhone 6 is an exceptional phone in nearly every way but for its good-but-not-great battery life. The iPhone 6 Plus is also impressive; larger and thinner than other iPhone models, and with the capacity for far more endurance on a single charge than most comparably-sized and smaller competitors.

As great a phone as it is, the iPhone 6 Plus isn’t for everybody. Its defining characteristic is its size, which occupies a nice middle ground between the 4-inch iPhone 5S and the 7.9-inch iPad Mini . While the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 is considerably more portable, the 6 Plus will hit the sweet spot for those who want a bigger display on their smartphone (and prefer iOS to Android).

And remember: a 5.5-inch screen may feel gigantic at first, but it may end up feeling just right in no time.

Editors’ note: This review was updated June 15, 2015 with new comparisons to more current phones, and other reflections on the 2015 smartphone and iPhone marketplace

 

 

iphone6 plus carmount dashcrab

 

Review update: Summer 2015

If Apple sticks to the same mid-September release calendar it’s followed for the past several years, we are just a few short months away from the next version of the iPhone. And if Cupertino follows the same upgrade plan — big redesigns for even numbered years, internal specs updates for odd ones — we can likely expect something a bit less radical than the big-screen makeover the iPhone got in 2014. (You can read our predictions of what to expect from the next iPhone here ).

At its Worldwide Developers Conference in June, Apple introduced the next edition of its mobile operating system, iOS 9 . Apple promised a stronger, more “proactive” version of Siri, the personal assistant; an upgraded maps app and a new news app; as well as, importantly for iPhone users, improved battery life (plus a new low-power mode for even longer performance). For now, iOS 9 is available only to developers; the rest of us can sign up for the public beta in July.

Those looking to purchase an iPhone this summer are advised that Apple also still sells the iPhone 5S and the iPhone 5C — both of which, in what are likely to be their waning days on store shelves, constitute an excellent value. If you’re looking to buy a larger phone or phablet, the iPhone 6 Plus , with its elegant design, fantastic camera, and user-friendly OS, certainly remains among our favorites. That noted, you might also consider the Galaxy Note 4 , an Android-based device with an appealing design, powerful performance, a great suite of native productivity tools, expandable storage and swappable battery, and a useful S Pen stylus.

source: www.cnet.com/products/apple-iphone-6-plus/

samsung galaxy s6 review dashcrab

Samsung Galaxy S6 Review: A True iPhone 6 Killer In Every Regard

Samsung Galaxy S6 Review: A True iPhone 6 Killer In Every Regard

samsung galaxy s6 review dashcrab

So 2014 wasn’t the best year for Samsung, it did ok with the Galaxy Note 4, but that was after the critical and commercial ass-paddling that came from the Galaxy S5, the firm’s then flagship. That was pretty much the first time a major Samsung device had been roundly greeted with a sharp inhalation of breath through gritted teeth. It didn’t sell well; people didn’t like it. The era of the plastic fantastic smartphone had come to an end, and for some reason Samsung hadn’t clocked it.

That meant something radical was needed – Project Zero. That’s what Samsung called the Galaxy S6 internally when it was in development; the firm was literally going back to the drawing board. Clunky, generic design made from plastic was to be replaced with something sleek and stylish, fashioned in metal and glass.

The plan didn’t exactly work, however, as Samsung’s sales, profits and ownership of the mobile space began to dwindle inside 2015. The main reason for this was Apple’s iPhone 6, which basically destroyed EVERYTHING in 2014/15. Unfortunately for Samsung, this looks likely to happen again this year with the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus, which sold in excess of 15 million during their first week on sale.

Samsung’s only countermove to this is its Galaxy S7 series of handsets which are due out at some point inside Q1 2016. A lot has already been written about the Galaxy S7’s specs, hardware and overall design but you can bet your ass there’ll be plenty more leaks and information published between now and Christmas.

So without further ado, let’s take a look at how the Samsung Galaxy S6 stacks up…

Samsung has pulled out all the stops when it comes to processing power, battery tech, and camera hardware. The use of its own Exynos processor chip over the darling of the Android space; Qualcomm’s Snapdragon, tantalisingly promises an even more robust and powerful smartphone experience than many key rivals.

The Galaxy S6 also launched alongside the Galaxy S6 EDGE, essentially the same phone but with some advanced display technology featuring a unique curved design on the two longer sides of the touchscreen. However, neither handset has managed to match Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in terms of sales –– at least just yet. According to data, the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 EDGE are seriously outperforming last year’s Galaxy S5, though neither are likely to give Apple’s iPhones any trouble anytime soon.

The Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 EDGE are fantastic Android handsets. They look great. They perform great. They even have decent battery life and some of the best displays in the business. But Samsung just isn’t selling enough of them – and this is bad new for the company. Very bad news, indeed.

According to the company’s Q2 financials, Samsung’s mobile business took a massive hit in the nuts, dropping 37.6% year-on-year. Meanwhile, Apple experienced HUGE growth during 2014/15 and is now by far and away the most profitable phone maker on the planet – nobody else even comes close.

“Samsung misread demand for its unique curved screen Galaxy S6 Edge model, instead focusing production efforts on normal versions that went head to head against iPhone,” notes Apple Insider. “A report covering Samsung’s earning estimates earlier this month cited a source as saying the company thought regular S6 sales would outpace S6 Edge four-to-one.”

Counterpoint expects Samsung’s flagship devices to hit sales of 50 million units by the end of the year.

Anyway…on with the review of the Galaxy S6 flagship!

 

source: www.knowyourmobile.com/mobile-phones/samsung-galaxy-s6/23128/samsung-galaxy-s6-review-true-iphone-6s-killer-every-regard-galaxy-s7

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The first thing everyone needs to do with a new iPhone 6s

The first thing everyone needs to do with a new iPhone 6s

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In my in-depth iPhone 6s review, I made the bold claim that this year’s iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus represent Apple’s biggest ever upgrade compared to the models they replace. This is a curious claim on the surface, considering “S” upgrades are typically somewhat iterative iPhone updates that offer general performance enhancements along with one new flagship feature. In 2015, however, we’re not just talking about your typical performance enhancements — the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus are the most powerful smartphones the world has ever seen by a huge margin, and the difference in performance compared to last year’s iPhones is huge. In fact, after more than a month with the new iPhone 6s, the insanely fast speed continues to surprise me.

Past examples of the aforementioned flagship feature include Siri and Touch ID, and this year 3D Touch is the star of the show. But iPhone users, I think we all need to just stop what we’re doing for a moment and chat about 3D Touch…

DON’T MISS: After a month with the iPhone 6s, these are the things that surprise me

Thursday is my first day back at work after a nice, long, much-needed vacation, during which I did a fair amount of traveling. I was at an airport a total of six times, I made my way through five different U.S. states, and I came across plenty of people in the process. Following the launch of Apple’s new iPhones this past September, a good amount of those people were obviously iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus users.

As I observed them in passing, I noticed two interesting things.

First, I was surprised at how many people I saw using 3D Touch gestures. I wasn’t going out of my way to watch people use their phones, obvious, but I just happened to notice plenty of occasions where people were using 3D Touch. From passengers waiting outside a gate at the airport to people showing off Live Photos on a cliff side in the Smoky Mountains, iPhone 6s users were using 3D Touch.

This really surprised me. I think 3D Touch is a great feature that marks the first meaningful change in smartphone input since the capacitive touchscreen, so I’m glad to see so many people taking advantage of the functionality. I don’t think Apple has done a good job at all in communicating how and where 3D Touch works though, which is why I was so surprised to see it being used so widely.

But that lack of communication leads me to the second interesting thing I noticed: People seem to believe they have to summon the strength of 1,000 weight lifters in order to use 3D Touch.

Perhaps Apple foresaw this issue and it played a role in the company’s decision to rename “Force Touch” to “3D Touch.” Well if that’s the case, it didn’t work. People still seem to think they need to use a huge amount of pressure in order to trigger things like Peeks and Pops. I seriously thought I was going to see some users push their fingers straight through their iPhone screens.

So first, a public service announcement — 3D Touch does not need that much force to recognize a firm press. And beyond that, it’s time to make sure that people’s phones (and fingers) are safe from this misconception, which is apparently widespread.

When you get a new iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus, here’s the first thing you should do after you set it up: Go into Settings > General > Accessibility and scroll down to 3D Touch. Open the 3D Touch menu and find the slider under “3D Touch Sensitivity,” then slide it all the way to “Light.” Then, underneath that slider, you’ll find a box where you can text how much pressure is needed to trigger things like Peeks and Pops. As you’ll soon find, it’s really not that much extra pressure.

Please, practice safe touching.

source: bgr.com/2015/11/05/iphone-6s-tips-tricks-3d-touch

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iPhone 6s Apple’s next-generation iPhone, launched September 25.

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Apple’s next-generation iPhone, launched September 25.

Apple announced its ninth-generation iPhones, the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus, at a media event in San Francisco, California on September 9, 2015. The iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus can be summed up beautifully with a single quote from Apple CEO Tim Cook: “While they may look familiar, we have changed everything about these new iPhones.”

Available with the same 4.7 and 5.5-inch Retina displays, the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus have the same exterior design as the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, but much of the hardware inside, from the camera to the processor, is new and improved. Core technologies like the touchscreen and the vibration engine have been updated, and the new devices are even constructed from an entirely new material.

The iPhone 6s and 6s Plus are made from a 7000 Series aluminum alloy, which is stronger and more durable than the 6000 series used in the previous-generation iPhones. Apple’s also updated the devices with stronger glass, made using a dual ion exchange process. One of the biggest changes is the introduction of a new aluminum finish in Rose Gold, which accompanies the traditional Silver, Space Gray, and Gold color options.

A new second-generation Touch ID module makes fingerprint detection twice as fast, and the 64-bit A9 processor in the two devices is 70 percent faster at CPU tasks and 90 percent faster at GPU tasks than the A8 processor in the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. A built-in M9 motion coprocessor enables new features, such as always-on “Hey Siri” functionality.

With the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, Multi-Touch has been expanded to encompass a third dimension through a 3D Touch feature, and Apple is calling this “the future of Multi-Touch.” In addition to recognizing a tap, sensors in the iPhones can also recognize pressure, enabling a range of new shortcut gestures that Apple’s calling the “Peek” and “Pop.” A new Taptic Engine provides tactile feedback whenever the pressure-based gestures are used.

Most of Apple’s “S” year upgrades include camera improvements, and the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus are no exception. Both devices have a 12-megapixel camera with some internal improvements to preserve color accuracy and speed up autofocus. The iPhone 6s Plus has Optical Image Stabilization, while the iPhone 6s does not.

With the improved camera, 4K video at 30 FPS is supported, and the iPhones can capture 63 megapixel panoramas. There’s a 5-megapixel front-facing FaceTime camera with a True Tone Retina Flash feature that lights up the display of the iPhone just before a photo is captured.

The most novel camera-based feature available for the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus is Live Photos, a feature that captures 1.5 seconds of movement before and after a photo is taken to display short animations and sound when a 3D Touch gesture is used on an image. Live Photos is designed to add a sense of vitality and life to still photos.
When it comes to connectivity, both LTE and Wi-Fi speeds have been improved. With LTE Advanced, LTE is twice as fast at up to 300 Mb/s, and 23 LTE bands are supported. Compared to the previous-generation iPhones, the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus are twice as fast when connected to Wi-Fi, with Wi-Fi speeds up to 866 Mb/s.

The iPhone 6s and 6s Plus became available for pre-order in the first wave of countries on Saturday, September 12 at 12:01 a.m. Pacific Time, with an official launch taking place on Friday, September 25.

Apple sold 13 million iPhone 6s and 6s Plus units during launch weekend, beating iPhone 6 and 6 Plus launch sales in 2014, and setting a new opening weekend sales record.

 

Reviews

 

Apple provided multiple publications with iPhone 6 and 6s Plus review units ahead of the device’s launch, and we’ve gathered excerpts from each site in order to highlight the general release reaction to Apple’s latest iOS devices.

Reviews have been largely positive, with most reviewers loving the 3D Touch and Live Photos features, plus the speed of the new iPhones and the updated 12-megapixel camera. The consensus is the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus are a fantastic update for customers who use an iPhone 5s or older, but may not be as worth it for iPhone 6 and 6 Plus owners.

Jim Dalrymple of The Loop called the iPhone 6s the “strongest ‘S’ model phone Apple has ever released,” and highlighted 3D Touch as a favorite feature on the device. He also pointed out the faster Touch ID feature, saying it’s fast enough that it unlocks as soon as you tap to wake it up.

3D Touch is one of the handiest features that I’ve seen from Apple in a long time. It’s not just that it’s cool, it actually saves me time. It’s a new way to navigate the iPhone that’s quick, easy, and efficient. […]

3D Touch and Quick Actions are definitely something you will have to get used to. There are things we’re used to doing on the iPhone, like pressing on an app icon to delete it, that will take a bit of practice to get right. I had a difficult time tapping on an Apple Music playlist to bring up the menu–it would always go into “peek” mode for me. It took a couple of days, but I finally got my thumb to do it properly.
TechCrunch’s Matthew Panzarino highlighted processor performance and noted how useful the iPhone’s processing power is when combined with its ability to shoot 4K video.
4K video reel shot by TechCrunch
If you’re curious, the iPhone 6 Plus scored a 2716 in multi-core performance and 1517 in single-core score. The iPhone 6s Plus notched a blistering 2515/4367. The iPhone 6s scored similarly. […]

When Apple’s achievement with the A9 processor really starts to shine is when you realize that you can chop and edit these enormous video files in real-time right in iMovie. Or when you want to look at a bit of video closer and you pinch-to-zoom in and it’s playing back in crisp 1080p at a 4x zoom ratio right on the screen. This takes a mind-boggling amount of processing power, and Apple’s on-board chip is more than capable.
John Paczkowski of Buzzfeed was a fan of Live Photos, finding them to be more than just a gimmick. He also thought the iPhone was noticeably snappier than previous iPhones, and found that photos look “warmer, sharper, and more detailed.”

I was fully prepared to dismiss them as an S-year gimmick. But they’re actually quite compelling. Some are briefly humorous, others are totally worthless; but when you get a good one, it’s really something else. If I were a new parent, I would upgrade to the 6s for Live Photos alone. It’s a powerful feature, powerfully executed.

My daughters say Live Photos are a lot like the moving pictures in Harry Potter, and they’re not all that far off. Certainly, they make scrolling through photos on the iPhone playful, infinitely more interesting, and, on occasion, utterly fantastic.
YouTuber Marques Brownlee shared an unboxing and some first impressions on the iPhone 6s. He was a fan of the camera, which he said was super fast with natural, true to life images.
Sam Grobart of Bloomberg pointed out the incredibly fast A9 processor in the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, which significantly outperforms the A8 in the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.

We’re used to hearing that New Phone has a faster processor than Old Phone, but in this case, Apple’s A9 processor just screams with speed. Moving between apps is lightning fast. Fast-moving games are as smooth as Billy Dee Williams on a silk surfboard.
Yahoo Tech’s David Pogue got great photos from the iPhone 6s, but couldn’t tell much of a difference between images taken with the new phone and the older iPhone 6. He was a fan of the new front-facing selfie flash, which he said works “fantastically well.” Overall, though, he didn’t think it would be worth it to get an iPhone 6s if you have an iPhone 6.

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Pogue’s iPhone 6 and 6s comparison images. iPhone 6 shot on the right.
I’ve been taking lots of pictures in lots of lighting situations with the iPhone 6 and 6s side-by-side, and I can’t tell any difference. Can you?

Now, it’s not a slam to say that photos taken with the 6s don’t look any better than those captured on an iPhone 6; the iPhone 6 camera was already among the best ever put into a phone. But you shouldn’t expect a leap forward in most of your shots.
The Wall Street Journal’s Joanna Stern focused on battery life, pointing out that there’s no improvement between the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6.

The No. 1 thing people want in a smartphone is better battery life. And the iPhone 6s doesn’t deliver that.

The 4.7-inch 6s will get you through the day, but you’ll struggle to make it til bedtime with moderate to heavy use. And it seemed to drain even faster than my 6 when I used the new processor-intensive camera features like Live Photos.
The Verge’s Walt Mossberg called the iPhone 6s “the best phone on the market.” He found 3D Touch to be a fun and useful feature, but noted that it will take time for developers to build support for it into their apps.
In actual use, though, it’s kind of easy to forget about 3D Touch, because only a selection of Apple’s apps support it right now. It’s kind of like right click on OS X — the interface is designed to be used without it, but once you realize it’s there, it’s incredibly useful, and you want every app to make solid, consistent use of it. In that sense, 3D Touch won’t really be that useful or revolutionary until third parties really grab onto it.

source: macrumors.com/roundup/iphone-6s

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